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Sunday, March 26, 2017
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The more I research the buildings involved in baseball, the industry, the more I realize two things.

1. The types and variety of buildings reflect all kinds of architectural styles, from colonial farmhouse factory to strip mall. The rather simple vocabularies of these buildings should be easy to manipulate in order to create the "right-sized" buildings and still maintain their familiar character.

2. Manufacturing is now done overseas. Many of the old buildings are in the process or have already been converted to lofts. In terms of architecture models, all this means is cleaner roofs with fewer chimneys and more reflective windows with beefier fire-escapes bolted on. And all the shrubs... condo dwellers love hedging, I guess.

 

 

The Harwood Baseball Factory, Natick MA

The front side is Mainstreet-USA, but the back shown side is a bit more appealing to me as an 1840's factory structure.


http://www.milb.com/milb/info/museums.jsp?mc=_massachusetts

http://www.panoramio.com/photo/42922241

 

 

Rawlings baseball glove factory, Toronto Canada

Probably the main difference between the time the factory was running and now is the the windows. The originals were probably clear glass in a simple grid rather than the 90's bowtop-infill-specials currently installed. The low ground level seems to indicate the original building design probably had power generation or other extremely heavy equipment located on the lower floors. This building does not have direct rail connection.


http://www.myarea.ca/One_Columbus_Avenue

 

 

Nokona baseball glove factory, Nocona TX

Not every industry has to look industrial. Some can look downright commercial. Simple sign and awning combo can be a winner, unless it's time square. Also, great telegraph poles down the right side of the photograph.

http://www.suitcasesandsippycups.com/2011/08/made-in-the-usa-factory-tournokona-baseball-gloves.html

 

 

 

Little League Museum, Williamsport PA

Small and colonial with exceptional proportions, including coupola and weather vane, I'm sure Jefferson would be proud of those 3 roman arches on the portico. Unfortunately the architect quoined the corners of the building, but I was lucky enough to find this great photo with them cropped out.


http://www.littleleague.org/learn/museum.htm

 

 

That's about all I have for now. If you have any buildings or ideas for industries (retail or commercial), please let me know. I'm looking at clothing factories, base plates and helmet factories, and probably some green houses too.

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