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Micronart's girder bridge

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11 years 2 months ago #5244 by David K. Smith
Replied by David K. Smith on topic Re:Micronart's girder bridge
TerryH wrote:

Thanks David. I'm still new at this and I don't know where to find the specs or even which specs to follow. It would be very much appreciated if you could make a list of URLs where a newbie could go to learn about the basic specs, etc. If you don't have the time that is OK. Thanks again for your help.


IIR, coupler specs are usually printed on the label inserts for Micro-Trains rolling stock. Unfortunately, their website does not have anything that I can find on coupler specs. You will, however, find lots of useful information here: www.zscale.org/articles/couplers.html

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11 years 2 months ago #5251 by dominique
Replied by dominique on topic Re:Micronart's girder bridge
Socalz44 wrote:

Terry, I always put guardrails on my bridges. They look cool. On the other hand David's photos showed examples of no guardrails. My thoughts about this are to do what makes you happy. If you want to expend the time and effort for these then go ahead. If your layout is going to be seen by non-modelers then who cares if you have them or not? They won't know the difference. Same with bridge track. Most of my bridges just use standard MTL flex. As for guard rails themselves: 1. Spacing between the mainline should be just larger than the wheel flanges. You don't what wheels rubbing on the guardrails. 2. If you use regular Code 55 rail you will have some issues. First, you will have to leave the ends open to accomodate the brass uncoupling mechanism on the MTL couplers. I think Marklins will touch also. Second, many steamers will rub on the tops of the guardrails. Not good. If Code 40 rail is used you will not have the above issues. CA glue is what I use. Cheers, Jim CCRR:)


Jim, even if the layout is due to be seen by "non-railroaders" in my case I can't stand to see something that seems unprototypical. You were speaking of shots showing bridges with no guardrails? As far as I remember, they were "shut" bridges, ie designs that don't let a derailed train falling down into the river or the canyon. I guess on other designs (girder bridges for example) guardrails are present to prevent that any derailed train slips sidewards and falls down... As the only modelrailroader and the only individual having railroading culture in my family and friend list I couldn't admit having girder bridges without guardrails.

Now about modelrailroading issues regarding guardrails. Myself I put code 55 guardrails as I said earlier, and I've no issue. I don't run any steamer other than sometimes my GS4 (whose leading trucks don't seem to have a love affair with my Wright turnouts). But my diesels (all from MTL and AZL) run flawlessly on my bridges.

Dom

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11 years 2 months ago - 11 years 2 months ago #5252 by David K. Smith
Replied by David K. Smith on topic Re:Micronart's girder bridge
dominique wrote:

You were speaking of shots showing bridges with no guardrails? As far as I remember, they were "shut" bridges, ie designs that don't let a derailed train falling down into the river or the canyon. I guess on other designs (girder bridges for example) guardrails are present to prevent that any derailed train slips sidewards and falls down... As the only modelrailroader and the only individual having railroading culture in my family and friend list I couldn't admit having girder bridges without guardrails.

This is not necessarily true. Guardrails on "shut" bridges served the purpose of preventing damage to the bridge as much as preventing cars from falling off. Thus you will see guardrails on any kind of bridge (review the photos in my previous post--or Google "railroad bridges" for tons of additional reference photos). Also, guardrails were sometimes added in tunnels to prevent cars from striking the tunnel walls and creating a mess of cars deep inside a mountain, although examples of this practice are hard to find.

The problem was that guardrails weren't very good at doing what they were supposed to do, and over time have been used less and less. Today guardrails are actually becoming a rare sight. For example, here's a bridge I shot recently that's not "shut" but which has no guardrails:



And here are some girder bridges with no guardrails:

www.railroadforums.com/photos/data/504/BNSF5434_10-20-05_c.JPG

www.railroadforums.com/photos/data/504/BNSF7909_7-11-06_b.JPG

www.vwindependent.com/MP%20Railroad%20Bridge%204-24-08.jpg

Believe it or not, this towering trestle (the Latah Creek Bridge in Washington State) has no guardrails:

farm1.static.flickr.com/39/104327395_8f8464bd51.jpg

So, not bothering with guardrails would not be "unprototypical", particularly on layouts set in more modern times.

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11 years 2 months ago #5255 by dominique
Replied by dominique on topic Re:Micronart's girder bridge
Interresting, interresting.... Once more I learnt something today, thank you David.;)

But as I definitly find terrific guardrail's look on girder bridges, I keep mine on.B)

Dom

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11 years 2 months ago #5260 by David K. Smith
Replied by David K. Smith on topic Re:Micronart's girder bridge
dominique wrote:

But as I definitly find terrific guardrail's look on girder bridges, I keep mine on.


No argument there. They do add a nice touch.

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